Stevie Woods:author of gay romantic fiction

March 27, 2011

A Favor For A Friend is for sale at ARe!

Filed under: writing — Stevie Woods @ 9:23 am
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A Favor For A Friend (An "Other Worlds" Story)

 

A Favor For A Friend (An “Other Worlds” Story)

By: Stevie Woods | Other books by Stevie Woods
Published By: Amber Quill Press, LLC
ISBN # 9781611240801
Word Count: 17000
Heat Index

Available in: Adobe Acrobat, Microsoft Reader, HTML, Mobipocket (.prc), Rocket, Epub

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About the book

On Alkya, a planet a long way from Earth, the Division of Investigation – Other Worlds – has set up a base where hundreds of personnel live and work. Among them are two men, Major Jake Archer and Captain Bart Hilton, who are part of one of the survey teams.

One evening, Jake asks Bart to do a work-related favor for him, requiring the other man to remain in the underground base. Needing information to complete the report he’s preparing, Bart goes to Jake’s office just as a huge explosion rips through the base.

Jake is horrified and riddled with guilt when he learns that Bart is missing and was last seen approaching Jake’s office before the explosion. Unsure if Bart is still alive, Jake and his team are forced to wait for the engineers to dig out the man Jake secretly loves.

In pain, unable to move, Bart lies amidst the rubble, sliding in and out of consciousness. During his lucid moments, he lets his mind drift to better times, most of them spent with his friend Jake. And he also fears the roof will finally come down and kill him before he gets a chance to resolve his greatest regret – telling Jake how he really feels about him…

An excerpt from the book

Jake was jarred from his thoughts when he felt the earth beneath his feet shudder. He was puzzled but he decided it was probably something going on in one of the labs in the lower levels of the underground base. Bart wasn’t the only scientist to work long hours. Jake was debating returning to the base when he heard an alarm screeching out into the night.

He pulled out his comm-unit and tried to get a response as he ran back to the base. He couldn’t get through and when he reached the guard at the entrance he yelled, “What’s happened?”

“I don’t know, sir.” The man was holding his own comm. “Can’t get through.”

Nodding, Jake ran on past straight for the elevator. “Better to take the stairs, sir.”

He waved at the guard and swerved for the stairs instead. As he vaulted down the steps, he tried his comm again, more out of panic than expectation and had about given up when he got a response, and as the words washed over him he almost dropped the comm-unit.

The message kept repeating in his head. An explosion had taken place in the armory on level nine causing extensive damage to floors eight, nine and ten resulting in multiple injuries to a variety of personnel.

Bart’s office was on eight.

There had been no mention of Bart being injured. However, that didn’t stop Jake’s panic kicking in big time – fuelled by his guilt. Bart would’ve left hours earlier if he hadn’t been doing Jake a favor. God, how could I put a damned recital before Bart’s safety! No, no it wasn’t like that, it wasn’t. He could tell himself that logically and know it was true, but it had no affect in assuaging his guilt. Please let him be all right, please.

The thought did slip through his mind that if he had been working on the report in his own office on level ten, almost directly below the armory, it would probably have been him the rest of his team would be worrying about right now.

He reached the control centre, looking for General Banks, but only Sergeant Nilson was there. Without preamble, Jake asked, “Do we know anything about casualties? Captain Hilton was working late. Is he accounted for?”

“Major, everything is still very confused. We had two fatalities on level nine, two technical staff working in the laboratory next to the armory. Casualties are being taken to the medical bay which thankfully sustained no damage. I have heard reports there are trapped personnel on at least two floors. I don’t have any information about Captain Hilton.”

“Could you check on his whereabouts for me? Where’s the general?”

“I’ll do what I can, sir. The rescue operation is being directed from level seven, sir. General Banks is there.”

“Thank you, Sergeant Nilson. I’ll report to the general.”

“Sir.”

Jake hurried toward the elevator and saw a car waiting. He ran in and jabbed at the button. As soon as the car moved, he dropped his head and took a breath. His first reaction was relief; there was no information that Bart was injured. Then he snapped his head up–no information at all.

He got off the elevator at level seven, which also happened to be where the medical bay was situated. The first person he saw was Lieutenant Carl Bradley, who was talking to Sergeant Ron Eisley.

“Carl!” he called.

Bradley and Eisley turned swiftly at the sound of his voice.

“Major, I was wondering where you were,” Carl said.

“I was in the control centre, trying to see if there was news about Bart. Do you know what happened?”

“I’m afraid that is still something of a mystery, Major,” Banks spoke up.

“Sir.” Jake turned smartly at the sound of his commander’s voice. “Sorry I didn’t report immediately, but I was concerned about Bart. He was working in his office and–”

“Captain Hilton? There was no one in his office. It has been damaged, but not too severely.”

Jake sighed with relief. “He must’ve finished then.” Jake wondered why he wasn’t here, somewhere. Bart would’ve wanted to help in any way he could. On another level most likely.

“Excuse me, sir,” Sergeant Nilson said, approaching the general. “The major asked me to check on Captain Hilton’s whereabouts.”

“It’s okay, Sergeant. It sounds as if he’d finished and gone up top,” Jake said.

“No, sir, he hasn’t,” Nilson said turning to Jake, his expression making Jake’s stomach twist. “Captain Hilton has not signed out and, according to Lieutenant Garber, he was seen on level ten shortly before the explosion.”

 

 

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